How to Train Your Dog to Get Along with Other Dogs

Published on 06/23/2020
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Technically speaking, dogs are sociable beings. They enjoy the company of others but this doesn’t mean that they can always be friendly with every dog they come in contact with. When your four-legged friend becomes aggressive towards another canine, it can be disappointing and frustrating for both of you. Begin by showing your pup who is boss; dogs always follow the lead of the alpha or leader of the pack, and that should be you. They should begin by learning to listen to your command so that you can always be in control of the situation.Technically speaking, dogs are sociable beings. They enjoy the company of others but this doesn’t mean that they can always be friendly with every dog they come in contact with. When your four-legged friend becomes aggressive towards another canine, it can be disappointing and frustrating for both of you. Begin by showing your pup who is boss; dogs always follow the lead of the alpha or leader of the pack, and that should be you. They should begin by learning to listen to your command so that you can always be in control of the situation.

How To Train Your Dog To Get Along With Other Dogs

How To Train Your Dog To Get Along With Other Dogs

Introductions and familiarity matter a lot to dogs

Keep the introductions sweet and simple by doing it in a neutral and safe environment that is calm for both dogs. Have them loosely leashed so you can easily pull back if need be. Have them sniff each other (scents play a role as well). Walk around the area but make sure that both dogs walk parallel to each other. This shows that they are equals. Be observant of their body language and if your pet is reacting positively, give him rewards. Be mindful of wary or aggressive body language, like a stiff body or high tail. When your dog displays a calm disposition, you would know. If they are fearful, they would have their tails between their legs, their body low to the ground, their ears pinned back, and they hardly make any eye contact.

Give a helping hand

Dogs, like people, don’t become the best of friends overnight. Some dogs take a certain dislike to a new dog and that’s fine and normal. You can help by giving your dog breaks and letting her calm down before reintroducing their new canine buddy. It will take days, weeks even, for both to warm up and begin becoming comfortable with each other. If you’re bothered by the way your pup is behaving, you can call an expert and have a chat. Always be observant of their body language. Never ignore your dog’s adverse reactions to another animal. It’s important that you help her feel calm again. If you are still concerned, you may call a certified applied animal behaviorist (CAAB or ACAAB), a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, or a certified pet trainer to help assess what triggers your dog’s adverse reactions.
Dogs, like people, don’t become the best of friends overnight. Some dogs take a certain dislike to a new dog and that’s fine and normal. You can help by giving your dog breaks and letting her calm down before reintroducing their new canine buddy. It will take days, weeks even, for both to warm up and begin becoming comfortable with each other. If you’re bothered by the way your pup is behaving, you can call an expert and have a chat. Always be observant of their body language. Never ignore your dog’s adverse reactions to another animal. It’s important that you help her feel calm again. If you are still concerned, you may call a certified applied animal behaviorist (CAAB or ACAAB), a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, or a certified pet trainer to help assess what triggers your dog’s adverse reactions.

Give A Helping Hand

Give A Helping Hand

Be on the lookout for problematic behavior

If your dog really doesn’t feel comfortable being with another dog, don’t force the issue. You might be forcing your dog into a situation they are simply not ready for. Making sure that your pet has stress relief exercises and mental stimulation will greatly help them. Before you head out to a highly-populated area like the park, assess your dog’s comfort levels first.

Make sure that playtimes have breaks in between too. Dogs know how to control the intensity level of playtime by making breaks themselves. For example, they might do things like look away, take a pause, walk away, or shake off their body as if they are wet. If you notice your dog not doing any of these things, be proactive by stopping playtime for a few moments. If all your efforts aren’t rewarded, you may consult a pet behaviorist.

Remember that dogs can get along with other dogs. It’s a matter of being patient, consistent effort, and providing a safe and calm environment.

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